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BOOK DETAILS

Poetry
82 pp
6 x 9.25
Paperback
978-1-933880-25-9
September 2011


Emerging Voices

Misery Islands,
by January Gill O’Neil

Spooky Action at a Distance,
by Howard Levy

My Painted Warriors,
by Peggy Penn

Red Canoe: Love In Its Making, by Joan Cusack Handler

door of thin skins,
by Shira Dentz

The One Fifteen to Penn Station, by Kevin Carey

Where the Dead Are,
by Wanda S. Praisner

Darkening the Grass, by Michael Miller

Neighborhood Register,
by Marcus Jackson

Night Sessions,
by David S. Cho

Underlife,
by January Gill O'Neil

The Second Night of the Spirit, by Bhisham Bherwani

Imago,
by Joseph O. Legaspi

WE AREN'T WHO WE ARE and this world isn't either,
by Christine Korfhage

Through a Gate of Trees,
by Susan Jackson

Against Which,
by Ross Gay

The Silence of Men,
by Richard Jeffrey Newman

The Dishelved Bed,
by Andrea Carter Brown

The Singers I Prefer,
by Christian Barter

The Fork Without Hunger,
by Laurie Lamon

An Imperfect Lover,
Poems and watercolors by Georgianna Orsini

Soft Box,
by Celia Bland

Rattle,
by Eloise Bruce

Momentum,
by Catherine Doty

Silk Elegy,
by Sondra Gash

The Palace of Ashes,
by Sherry Fairchok

Eyelevel: Fifty Histories,
by Christopher Matthews

GLOrious,
by Joan Cusack Handler

So Close, by Peggy Penn

Snakeskin Stilettos,
by Moyra Donaldson

Grub, by Martin Mooney

Kazimierz Square,
by Karen Chase

A Day This Lit,
by Howard Levy

CavanKerry Press LTD.
CavanKerry Press

Neighborhood Register

by Marcus Jackson

Neighborhood Register, Marcus JacksonFrom the twilight towns of the Rust Belt to the vivid inlets of New York City, Neighborhood Register is a ledger of the people, scenes, and sectors from which hidden music and meaning unearth. This debut collection coalesces the vital details of American locale, the beauties and difficulties within multi-racial families, the value of vernacular, and the unexpected resonances of common objects. Jackson’s poems invite the reader close with accessible, ardent tones, and they deeply strike the mind and heart with immense instances of trouble and love.

In Neighborhood Register, his fine first collection of poems, Marcus Jackson lyrically knits together time, memory, human desires and obligations and invites the kind reader to dance along to his bright measures, which sometimes resemble the life of a young poet, deeply enmeshed in the world, and sometimes reflect like a mirror. — Cornelius Eady

The map refolds, roads jumble as if/ a suitcase of sentences," says Marcus Jackson, and indeed Neighborhood Register is a kind of questing, the poems themselves road songs in which Jackson presents indelible portraits from a life lived hard, lived honestly or as honestly as possible. The voices here sing from the "selective heavens" that they need to believe in, given the heart that's been fooled, given how "Nice cars, pretty people/ have you thinkin' that they stable,/ but beauty so easy to break." Like Langston Hughes, Jackson uses the clearest language to celebrate the complexity and durability of the human will. — Carl Phillips

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

MARCUS JACKSON was born in Toledo, Ohio. His poetry has appeared in The New Yorker, Harvard Review, The Cincinnati Review, and Hayden's Ferry Review, among many other publications. He has received fellowships from New York University and Cave Canem.

EXCERPT

Ode to Kool-Aid
You turn the kitchen
tap’s metallic stream
into tropical drink,
extra sugar whirlpooling
to the pitcher-bottom
like gypsum sand.
Purplesaurus Rex, Roarin’
Rock-A-Dile Red, Ice Blue
Island Twist, Sharkleberry Fin;
on our tongues, each version
keeps a section, like tiles
on the elemental table.
In ninth grade, Sandra
employed a jug of Black Cherry
to dye her straightened
bangs burgundy.
When toddlers swallow you,
Their top lips mustache in color
As if they’ve kissed paint.
The trendy folks can savor
all that imported mango nectar
and health-market juice.
We need factory-crafted packets,
unpronounceable ingredients,
a logo cute enough to hug,
a drink unnaturally sweet
so that, on the porch,
as summer sun receded,
Granddad takes out his teeth
to make more mouth to admit you.