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BOOK DETAILS

Poetry
106 pp
8.25 x 8.5
Paperback
0-9707186-4-0
978-0-9707186-4-8
September 2003


Emerging Voices

Misery Islands,
by January Gill O’Neil

Spooky Action at a Distance,
by Howard Levy

My Painted Warriors,
by Peggy Penn

Red Canoe: Love In Its Making, by Joan Cusack Handler

door of thin skins,
by Shira Dentz

The One Fifteen to Penn Station, by Kevin Carey

Where the Dead Are,
by Wanda S. Praisner

Darkening the Grass, by Michael Miller

Neighborhood Register,
by Marcus Jackson

Night Sessions,
by David S. Cho

Underlife,
by January Gill O'Neil

The Second Night of the Spirit, by Bhisham Bherwani

Imago,
by Joseph O. Legaspi

WE AREN'T WHO WE ARE and this world isn't either,
by Christine Korfhage

Through a Gate of Trees,
by Susan Jackson

Against Which,
by Ross Gay

The Silence of Men,
by Richard Jeffrey Newman

The Dishelved Bed,
by Andrea Carter Brown

The Singers I Prefer,
by Christian Barter

The Fork Without Hunger,
by Laurie Lamon

An Imperfect Lover,
Poems and watercolors by Georgianna Orsini

Soft Box,
by Celia Bland

Rattle,
by Eloise Bruce

Momentum,
by Catherine Doty

Silk Elegy,
by Sondra Gash

The Palace of Ashes,
by Sherry Fairchok

Eyelevel: Fifty Histories,
by Christopher Matthews

GLOrious,
by Joan Cusack Handler

So Close, by Peggy Penn

Snakeskin Stilettos,
by Moyra Donaldson

Grub, by Martin Mooney

Kazimierz Square,
by Karen Chase

A Day This Lit,
by Howard Levy

CavanKerry Press LTD.
CavanKerry Press

GLOrious

by Joan Cusack Handler

Foreword by Afaa Michael Weaver

GloriousGLOrious takes the broad and dangerous campaign into the heart of betrayal and loss, dangerous inasmuch as humanity would rather not believe the deepest depths of its own cruelty, the way it seeks its own ending by murdering its promise. In this shimmering collection, Joan Handler shows us the gems that come from pain in the fragile fibers of her spirit, as the poems fall like pearls fleeing their binding string to be reborn . . . The spirit of the book lives as the poet lives, seeking and then knowing and seeking again. —Afaa Michael Weaver

Crowned by the protean, sensuous language that whiplashes across its pages, GLOrious is glorious . . . With her sinewy humor, bravura honesty and fierce excess, Handler becomes a warrior goddess of the psycho-poetics she champions. Her canny insights and uncanny intuition reinvigorate our world. —Molly Peacock

Joan Cusack Handler . . . writes of the body’s unapologetic continuing . . . with a largesse that volleys between tender and roaring. Her lines blow wide, her metaphors tree tall as she roots the whole oaken structure in her signature loamy sexuality . . . She renders the psychological spiritual and back again . . . Few writers . . . have dared this kind of generosity, and . . . confronted Spirit with such fervent audacity and won. —Maureen Seaton, The Boston Review

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Joan Cusack HandlerBronx native JOAN CUSACK HANDLER’s first poetry collection, GLOrious, debuted in 2003 and was hailed as “an open field verse bildungsroman of adulthood” by Publishers Weekly. Its companion CD was produced in 2007. Recipient of four Pushcart nominations and The Sampler Award from The Boston Review, her poems have appeared in Agni, The New York Times, Poetry East and Seattle Review. She’s Founder/Publisher of CavanKerry Press and a clinical psychologist and lives in Fort Lee, NJ and East Hampton, NY with her husband, Alan, a retired psychologist. Their one son, David, is co-founder of (Le) Poisson Rouge, a music/ arts venue at the former Village Gate in NYC.

EXCERPT

SAD

…    is a tunne
linside my chest:
hot, tight, small
and  dark.  Not
t o t a lly black,
e nough    gray
for  me  to  see
the s h a d ows
I make a l o ne
here:the beaten
calf, theburned
b r a n c h e s,
the bruisedgrey
stone. No, it is
not enough for
Sad to sit here
qu i etly a lone
—content to be
left alone. No,
it must insist it
-self into every
place that jOy
lives or recalls.
G  r  e  e  d  y
for something
so knotted  &
small), it takes
m   o    r   e